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Plato : POLITEIA

Persons of the dialogue: Socrates - Glaucon - Polemarchus
 - Adeimantus - Cephalus - Thrasymachus - Cleitophon

Translated by Benjamin Jowett - 61 Pages (Part 1) - Greek fonts
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POLITEIA part 1 of 2, 3, 4, 5

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This Part: 61 Pages


Part 1 Page 3

I will tell you, Socrates, he said, what my own feeling is. Men of my age flock together; we are birds of a feather, as the old proverb says; and at our meetings the tale of my acquaintance commonly is —I cannot eat, I cannot drink; the pleasures of youth and love are fled away: there was a good time once, but now that is gone, and life is no longer life. Some complain of the slights which are put upon them by relations, and they will tell you sadly of how many evils their old age is the cause. But to me, Socrates, these complainers seem to blame that which is not really in fault. For if old age were the cause, I too being old, and every other old man, would have felt as they do. But this is not my own experience, nor that of others whom I have known. How well I remember the aged poet Sophocles, when in answer to the question, How does love suit with age, Sophocles, —are you still the man you were? Peace, he replied; most gladly have I escaped the thing of which you speak; I feel as if I had escaped from a mad and furious master. His words have often occurred to my mind since, and they seem as good to me now as at the time when he uttered them. For certainly old age has a great sense of calm and freedom Plato notes @ Elpenor [original: εἰρήνη καὶ ἐλευθερία = peace and freedom; read about the core meaning of freedom]; when the passions Plato notes @ Elpenor [original: ἐπιθυμίαι = desires] relax their hold, then, as Sophocles says, we are freed from the grasp not of one mad master only, but of many. The truth is, Socrates, that these regrets, and also the complaints about relations, are to be attributed to the same cause, which is not old age, but men's characters and tempers; for he who is of a calm and happy nature Plato notes @ Elpenor ['calm and happy' make the text opaque; the original is κόσμιοι καὶ εὔκολοι] will hardly Plato notes @ Elpenor [original: μετρίως = in measure] feel the pressure of age, but to him who is of an opposite disposition youth and age are equally a burden.

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