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Aristotle Bilingual Anthology : NATURE

from Aristotle's Metaphysics, * 1014b26-1015a19, translated by W. D. Ross, Greek Fonts


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Page 3

By an extension of meaning from this sense of 'nature' every essence in general has come to be called a 'nature', because the nature of a thing is one kind of essence. From what has been said, then, it is plain that nature in the primary and strict sense is the essence of things which have in themselves, as such, a source of movement; for the matter is called the nature because it is qualified to receive this, and processes of becoming and growing are called nature because they are movements proceeding from this. And nature in this sense is the source of the movement of natural objects, being present in them somehow, either potentially or in complete reality.

μεταφορᾷ δ΄ ἤδη καὶ ὅλως πᾶσα οὐσία φύσις λέγεται διὰ ταύτην͵ ὅτι καὶ ἡ φύσις οὐσία τίς ἐστιν. ἐκ δὴ τῶν εἰρημένων ἡ πρώτη φύσις καὶ κυρίως λεγομένη ἐστὶν ἡ οὐσία ἡ τῶν ἐχόντων ἀρχὴν κινήσεως ἐν αὑτοῖς ᾗ αὐτά· ἡ γὰρ ὕλη τῷ ταύτης δεκτικὴ εἶναι λέγεται φύσις͵ καὶ αἱ γενέσεις καὶ τὸ φύεσθαι τῷ ἀπὸ ταύτης εἶναι κινήσεις. καὶ ἡ ἀρχὴ τῆς κινήσεως τῶν φύσει ὄντων αὕτη ἐστίν͵ ἐνυπάρχουσά πως ἢ δυνάμει ἢ ἐντελεχείᾳ.

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Reference address : https://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/greek-texts/ancient-Greece/aristotle_nature.asp?pg=3