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Please note that Mommsen uses the AUC chronology (Ab Urbe Condita), i.e. from the founding of the City of Rome. You can use this reference table to have the B.C. dates

THE HISTORY OF OLD ROME

III. From the Union of Italy to the Subjugation of Carthage and the Greek States

From: The History of Rome, by Theodor Mommsen
Translated with the sanction of the author by William Purdie Dickson


The History of Old Rome

Chapter I - Carthage

ELPENOR EDITIONS IN PRINT

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» Contents of this Chapter

The Phoenicians ||| Their Commerce ||| Their Intellectual Endowments ||| Their Political Qualities ||| Carthage ||| Carthage Heads the Western Phoenicians in Opposition to the Greeks ||| The Carthaginian Dominion in Africa ||| Libyphoenicians ||| Naval Power of Carthage - Spain ||| Sardinia ||| Sicily ||| Maritime Supremacy - Rivalry with Syracuse ||| Constitution of Carthage - Council - Magistrates ||| Judges ||| Citizens ||| Character of the Government ||| Capital and Its Power in Carthage ||| Comparison between Carthage and Rome In Their Economy ||| In Their Constitution ||| In the Treatment of Their Subject ||| In Finance - In Their Military System


Arduum res gestas scribere. --Sallust.



The Phoenicians

The Semitic stock occupied a place amidst, and yet aloof from, the nations of the ancient classical world. The true centre of the former lay in the east, that of the latter in the region of the Mediterranean; and, however wars and migrations may have altered the line of demarcation and thrown the races across each other, a deep sense of diversity has always severed, and still severs, the Indo- Germanic peoples from the Syrian, Israelite, and Arabic nations. This diversity was no less marked in the case of that Semitic people which spread more than any other in the direction of the west--the Phoenicians.

Their native seat was the narrow border of coast bounded by Asia Minor, the highlands of Syria, and Egypt, and called Canaan, that is, the "plain." This was the only name which the nation itself made use of; even in Christian times the African farmer called himself a Canaanite. But Canaan received from the Greeks the name of Phoenike, the "land of purple," or "land of the red men," and the Italians also were accustomed to call the Canaanites Punians, as we are accustomed still to speak of them as the Phoenician or Punic race.

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Reference address : https://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/rome/3-01-carthage.asp