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Please note that Mommsen uses the AUC chronology (Ab Urbe Condita), i.e. from the founding of the City of Rome. You can use this reference table to have the B.C. dates

THE HISTORY OF OLD ROME

II. From the Abolition of the Monarchy in Rome to the Union of Italy

From: The History of Rome, by Theodor Mommsen
Translated with the sanction of the author by William Purdie Dickson


The History of Old Rome

CHAPTER II - The Tribunate of the Plebs and the Decemvirate

ELPENOR EDITIONS IN PRINT

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» Contents of this Chapter

Material Interests ||| Rising Power of the Capitalists ||| Public Land ||| Relations of the Social Question to the Question between Orders ||| Secession to the Sacred Mount ||| Plebian Tribunes and Plebian Aediles ||| Intercession ||| Legislation ||| Relation of the Tribune to the Consul ||| Political Value of the Tribunate ||| Further Dissensions ||| Coriolanus ||| Agrarian Law of Spurius Cassius ||| Decemvirs ||| Legislation of the Twelve Tables ||| Fall of the Decemvirs ||| The Valerio-Horatian Laws


Material Interests

Under the new organization of the commonwealth the old burgesses had attained by legal means to the full possession of political power. Governing through the magistracy which had been reduced to be their servant, preponderating in the Senate, in sole possession of all public offices and priesthoods, armed with exclusive cognizance of things human and divine and familiar with the whole routine of political procedure, influential in the public assembly through the large number of pliant adherents attached to the several families, and, lastly, entitled to examine and to reject every decree of the community,--the patricians might have long preserved their practical power, just because they had at the right time abandoned their claim to sole legal authority.

It is true that the plebeians could not but be painfully sensible of their political disabilities; but undoubtedly in the first instance the nobility had not much to fear from a purely political opposition, if it understood the art of keeping the multitude, which desired nothing but equitable administration and protection of its material interests, aloof from political strife. In fact during the first period after the expulsion of the kings we meet with various measures which were intended, or at any rate seemed to be intended, to gain the favour of the commons for the government of the nobility especially on economic grounds.

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Reference address : https://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/rome/2-02-tribunate-plebs-decemvirate.asp