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Please note that Mommsen uses the AUC chronology (Ab Urbe Condita), i.e. from the founding of the City of Rome. You can use this reference table to have the B.C. dates

THE HISTORY OF OLD ROME

I. The Period Anterior to the Abolition of the Monarchy

From: The History of Rome, by Theodor Mommsen
Translated with the sanction of the author by William Purdie Dickson


The History of Old Rome

CHAPTER X - The Greeks in Italy - Maritime Supremacy of the Tuscans and Carthaginians

ELPENOR EDITIONS IN PRINT

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» Contents of this Chapter

Relations of Italy with Other Lands ||| Phoenicians in Italy ||| Greeks in Italy - Home of the Greek Immigrants ||| Time of the Greek Immigration ||| Character of the Greek Immigration ||| The League of the Achaean Cities ||| Iono-Dorian Towns ||| Tarentum ||| Greek Cities Near Vesuvius ||| Relations of the Adriatic Regions to the Greeks ||| Relations of the Western Italians to the Greeks ||| Greeks and Latins ||| Greeks and Etruscans - Etruscan Maritime Power ||| Etruscan Commerce ||| Rivalry between the Phoenicians and Greeks ||| Phoenicians and Italians in Opposition to the Greeks


Relations of Italy with Other Lands

In the history of the nations of antiquity a gradual dawn ushered in the day; and in their case too the dawn was in the east. While the Italian peninsula still lay enveloped in the dim twilight of morning, the regions of the eastern basin of the Mediterranean had already emerged into the full light of a varied and richly developed civilization.

It falls to the lot of most nations in the early stages of their development to be taught and trained by some rival sister-nation; and such was destined to be in an eminent degree the lot of the peoples of Italy. The circumstances of its geographical position, however, prevented this influence from being brought to bear upon the peninsula by land. No trace is to be found of any resort in early times to the difficult route by land between Italy and Greece.

There were in all probability from time immemorial tracks for purposes of traffic, leading from Italy to the lands beyond the Alps; the oldest route of the amber trade from the Baltic joined the Mediterranean at the mouth of the Po--on which account the delta of the Po appears in Greek legend as the home of amber--and this route was joined by another leading across the peninsula over the Apennines to Pisae; but from these regions no elements of civilization could come to the Italians. It was the seafaring nations of the east that brought to Italy whatever foreign culture reached it in early times.

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Reference address : https://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/rome/1-10-greeks-italy-tuscans-carthaginians.asp