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Three Millennia of Greek Literature
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Please note that Mommsen uses the AUC chronology (Ab Urbe Condita), i.e. from the founding of the City of Rome. You can use this reference table to have the B.C. dates

THE HISTORY OF OLD ROME

I. The Period Anterior to the Abolition of the Monarchy

From: The History of Rome, by Theodor Mommsen
Translated with the sanction of the author by William Purdie Dickson


The History of Old Rome

CHAPTER IX - The Etruscans

ELPENOR EDITIONS IN PRINT

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Two periods in the development of the language may be clearly distinguished. In the older period the vocalization of the language was completely carried out, and the collision of two consonants was almost without exception avoided.(2)

2. To this period belong e. g. inscriptions on the clay vases of umaramlisia(--"θῆτα") ipurenaie(--"θῆτα") eeraisieepanamine (--"θῆτα") unastavhelefu- or -mi ramu (--"θῆτα") af kaiufinaia-.

By throwing off the vocal and consonantal terminations, and by the weakening or rejection of the vowels, this soft and melodious language was gradually changed in character, and became intolerably harsh and rugged.(3)

3. We may form some idea of the sound which the language now had from the commencement of the great inscription of Perusia; -eulat tanna laresul ameva (--"χι") r lautn vel (--"χι") inase stlaafunas slele (--"θῆτα") caru-.

They changed for example -ramu*af- into -ram*a-, Tarquinius into -Tarchnaf-, Minerva into -Menrva-, Menelaos, Polydeukes, Alexandros, into -Menle-, -Pultuke-, -Elchsentre-. The indistinct and rugged nature of their pronunciation is shown most clearly by the fact that at a very early period the Etruscans made no distinction of -o from -u, -b from -p, -c from -g, -d from -t.

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Reference address : https://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/rome/1-09-etruscans.asp?pg=2