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Rhapsody 11

Literally Translated, with Explanatory Notes, by Theodore Alois Buckley

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Page 3

And they,--as when reapers opposite to each other form swathes of wheat or barley along the field of a rich man, and the frequent handfuls fall,--so the Trojans and Greeks, rushing against one another, kept slaughtering: and neither thought of pernicious flight. And they held their heads equal in combat, and rushed on like wolves; whilst lamentable Discord, looking on, exulted: for she alone of the gods was present with them contending. But the other gods were not present with them, but sat quiet in their palaces, where beautiful mansions were built for each, along the summits of Olympus. All however blamed the Saturnian collector of dark clouds, because he wished to afford glory to the Trojans. But the sire did not regard them, but retiring by himself, sat down apart from the others, exulting in glory, looking both upon the city of the Trojans, and the ships of the Greeks, and the brightness of armour, and the slaying, and slain.

Whilst it was morn, and the sacred day was increasing, so long the weapons reached both sides, and the people fell. But at the time when the wood-cutter[366] has prepared his repast in the dells of a mountain, when he has wearied his hands hewing down lofty trees, and satiety comes upon his mind, and the desire of sweet food seizes his breast; then the Greeks, by their valour, broke the phalanxes, cheering their companions along the ranks.

[Footnote 366: Compare the similar allusion to rustic pursuits in xvi. 779, with Buttm. Lexil. p. 89.]

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