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Subject What is a caul?

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Publication 43 By Jennifer Labrecque on Sunday, August 26, 2001 at 17:41   
Location: Unavailable   Registered: Sunday, August 26, 2001  Posts: 1    Search for other posts by Jennifer Labrecque Search   Quote
Hi,

I am trying to tackle reading David Copperfield and am getting caught up in the terminology on the first page and can't find a definition in the dictionary. What is a "caul"? It is on the first page of chapter one and is in paragraph 4. I know that this may sound trivial to you but I would really like to read this book and get an understanding so that I can really enjoy it for how it was written.

Thank-you very much. I hope that you can find the time to reply.

Jennifer Labrecque

Publication 44 By absent-minded on Sunday, August 26, 2001 at 17:44   
Location: Greece   Registered: Friday, June 29, 2001  Posts: -166    Search for other posts by absent-minded Search   Quote
See the David Copperfield Dictionary at
https://www.ellopos.net/dickens/copper_dictionary.html

Publication 45 By ttracy on Sunday, August 26, 2001 at 17:45   
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Apparently, a caul is a part of the amnion covering a head at childbirth. I have no idea if this was what Dickens meant, because it seems disgusting that they would sell it!

Publication 46 By JoAnne on Sunday, August 26, 2001 at 17:47   
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A Caul is an embrionic covering. In the times (the 1800s, sailors used these as water sacs, or other fishing untensils (not really sure exactly, but I do know that the sailors used them. Does this help? Sailors were very crude men that could often make something out of nothing, even something gross like a caul, it is known that it may have even been good luch for the sailors.

Publication 47 By e on Sunday, August 26, 2001 at 17:53   
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The caul was sometimes found covering a baby's head at childbirth. It was removed, dried and sold (gross as that is) as a charm against drowning. It was believed that if you took it with you on the water it would keep you safe.

Publication 1343 By James Peet on Thursday, December 1, 2011 at 11:53   
Location: United States   Registered: Thursday, December 1, 2011  Posts: 1    Search for other posts by James Peet Search   Quote
A perfect place to find the answer to this question is in Wikipedia. The explanation is quite thorough and even explains it per the novel "David Copperfield"

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