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ELPENOR - Home of the Greek Word

Three Millennia of Greek Literature

 

Edwin Pears
Venetians and Crusaders take Constantinople (1204)
Plunder of the Sacred Relics

Part of Constantinople on the web section of Elpenor's history resources [15 Pages]

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ARISTOTLE

THE GREEK OLD TESTAMENT (SEPTUAGINT)

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DIONYSIUS THE AREOPAGITE

MAXIMUS CONFESSOR

SYMEON THE NEW THEOLOGIAN

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Page 15

Notes

 

[1] Transports.

[2] The Petrion, which is repeatedly mentioned by contemporary writers, was a district built on the slope of a hill running parallel to the Golden Horn for about one-third of the length of the harbor walls eastward from Blachern. It had apparently been a neglected spot during the early centuries of the history of Constantinople, but had lately come to be the residence of numerous hermits, and the site of several monasteries and convents. A great part is now occupied by the Jewish colony of Galata.

[3] Nicetas' _Chronicate_, Greek authority on the Latin conquest.

[4] Engines for throwing stones and other missiles.

[5] Alexius V, Byzantine Emperor.

[6] The remarkable church of this monastery still exists as a mosque, and is known as Eski imaret Mahallasse. It still bears witness to its having been arranged for both monks and nuns. It is on the Fourth Hill, just above the Phanar.

[7] Alexius V, his Greek name.

[8] It was the quarter about the gate in the harbor walls, now known as Zindan Capou, near the dried-fruit market.

[9] Another name of Constantinople.

[10] The Great Church, dedicated to [Christ] the Divine Wisdom; the Santa Sophia, built by Justinian.

[11] This office still exists. The principal duty of the person who holds it is to recite the creed in great religious services when the patriarch officiates.

 

      Cf. Papacy * From the Middle of the Eleventh Century to the Latin Conquest of Constantinople, by W. Berschin * Anna Comnena On the Crusaders * Robert of Clari, Latin Clergy Urge Conquest of Constantinople, The Sacred Relics of Constantinople *  Geoffrey of Villehardouin, The Latins Divide The Spoils * Nicetas Choniates, Destruction of Ancient Art in the Latin Sack of Constantinople * Eustathius of Thessalonica, Norman Atrocities and Devastation in Thessalonika * Nicholas Mesarites, Crusaders Run Wild in Constantinople * The Islamic View of Late Byzantium, by Nadia Maria El-Cheikh * David Turner, Byzantium : The 'alternative' history of Europe  * Al. Vasilief, A History of the Byzantine Empire * D. Constantelos, Greek Orthodoxy - From Apostolic Times to the Present Day

 

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Reference address : https://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/greek-texts/fathers/pears-constantinople-1204.asp?pg=15