Reference address : https://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/greek-texts/ancient-greece/homer/iliad-6.asp?pg=2

ELPENOR - Home of the Greek Word

Three Millennia of Greek Literature
HOMER HOME PAGE  /  HOMER EPICS  

HOMER'S ILIAD COMPLETE

Rhapsody 6

Literally Translated, with Explanatory Notes, by Theodore Alois Buckley

Homer Bilingual Anthology  Studies  Homer in Print



ELPENOR EDITIONS IN PRINT

Icon of the Christ and New Testament Reader
Page 2

But Diomede, brave in the din of war, slew Axylus, the son of Teuthras, who dwelt in well-built Arisba, rich in wealth, and he was beloved by men, for dwelling in a house near the public way, he was wont to afford entertainment to all. But none of them [his guests] coming up before him, warded off sad death; but [Diomede] deprived both of life, himself and his attendant Calesius, who then was the charioteer of his steeds, and both these entered the earth.

And Euryalus slew Dresus and Opheltius; and afterwards went against AEsepus and Pedasus, whom formerly the Naiad nymph Abarbarea brought forth to blameless Bucolion. Bucolion was the son of illustrious Laomedon, eldest by birth, but him his mother brought forth secretly. While [Bucolion] was a shepherd, he was mingled in love and nuptials with her amongst the sheep; but she becoming pregnant, brought forth twin sons. And truly the son of Mecisteus[235] relaxed their strength and their illustrious limbs, and tore the armour from their shoulders. And next warlike Polypoetes slew Astyalus. Ulysses killed Percosian Pidytes with his brazen spear; and Agamemnon, king of men, slew Elatus. He dwelt at lofty Pedasus, on the banks of fair-flowing Satniois. The hero Leitus slew Phylacus flying; and Eurypylus killed and spoiled Melanthius.

[Footnote 235: Euryalus.]

First / Next Page of this Rhapsody
Homer's Complete ILIAD & ODYSSEY Contents

Homer Bilingual Anthology ||| Elpenor's Free Greek Lessons
A Commentary on the ODYSSEY ||| Interlinear ILIAD
Three Millennia of Greek Literature

 

Greek Literature - Ancient, Medieval, Modern

  Iliad and Odyssey Home Page   Homer Home Page & Bilingual Anthology
Homer in Print

Elpenor's Greek Forum : Post a question / Start a discussion

Learned Freeware

 

Reference address : https://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/greek-texts/ancient-greece/homer/iliad-6.asp?pg=2