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Rhapsody 6

Literally Translated, with Explanatory Notes, by Theodore Alois Buckley

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ARGUMENT.

The gods having left the field, victory now inclines to the side of the Greeks, and Helenus counsels Hector to order a public supplication to Minerva in the citadel. While Hector is gone to the city for that purpose, Diomedes and Glaucus recognize the friendship which had formerly existed between their fathers, and exchange armour in token of amity. Hecuba and the Trojan matrons present a robe to Minerva, and offer up prayers for their country. Hector reproves Paris, and brings him back to the field, having first taken an affecting farewell of his wife and child.

 

And now the dreadful battle of the Trojans and the Greeks was abandoned. Often here and there the battle raged through the plain, [the combatants] directing against each other their brass-tipped spears, between the rivers of Simois and Xanthus.

First Telamonian Ajax, the bulwark of the Greeks, broke through the phalanx of the Trojans, and gave light[234] to his companions, smiting the good and mighty hero Acamas, son of Eyssorus, who was the bravest amongst the Thracians. First he struck him on the ridge of the horse-haired helmet; and the brazen spear fixed itself in his forehead, and passed on within the bone; but darkness veiled his eyes.

[Footnote 234: I. e. the light of hope. Cf. Virg. AEn. ii, 281: "O lux Dardaniae, spes o fidissima Teucrum." Quintus Calab. iii. 561. [Greek: Epei su moi ieron ymar, kai phaos eelioio peles].]

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