KOINONIA Greek Forum Login To Start Posting!
KOINONIA - Greek Forum
Profile | Active Topics | Latest Topics | Latest Replies | Popular
RSS Feed | Partners | Search | AFQ


» Forgot your Password?

 All Communities
 The language
 Speaking Greek
 Medieval Greek type of writing!?
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
Registration is closed. The Forum remains available only as a source of published information.

 


 
Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 2

Humanist

Albania
2 Posts

Posted - 10 Jan 2011 :  09:23:46  


Hello to everyone,
I would like to thank you for accepting me to this interesting forum, where we can debate or help each other about Greek Language.

I started to learn this language because I need it to transliterate Medieval-Byzantine texts for my MA thesis, in the meantime I have made a researches in the internet and found some texts about Greek Paleography but with different meanings when is a word about Greek alphabet.
My question about Greek language is: Which is the right type of writing or style of the Greek language to learn Byzantine Greek? Because in some texts it says that it modern greek, others its koine, attic etc.
I hope I can exept an answer from specialists of this forum or from the other friends here.

All the best


 

George

Greece
615 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2011 :  05:17:34  

 

Glad to have you with us!

All kinds of Greek will be useful when you study Byzantine Greek, but most of all Attic, in which the majority of Byzantine texts is written. Yet be aware that you will encounter other forms too. For example, some of Gregory the Theologian's works are written in Homeric Greek, etc.

Go to Top of Page


Aristokles

USA
44 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2011 :  08:38:02  

 

St. Gregory the Theologian, as in the son of St. Gregory Nazianzus?

Homeric? Any specific texts, or all?

Go to Top of Page


George

Greece
615 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2011 :  09:18:40  

 

St Gregory Nazianzen or St Gregory of Nazianzus is how usually western scholars refer to St Gregory of Constantinople the Theologian, as is known in the East. We call him "of Constantinople" because he was bishop of the City, and we also call him "the Theologian", because of his crucial contributions to the development of Christian theology.

His writings display great knowledge of Greek in all of the periods of the language. The most archaic elements, going back to Homer, are to be found in his poems (see Patrologia Graeca v. 37 and 38)

Go to Top of Page


Humanist

Albania
2 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2011 :  15:14:56  

 

Hi George,
Thank you for your explaining and welcoming honesty.
I hope I can learn modern Greek from internet, how much I can and then to start with the other types of writing.
I hope to find in the near future specialists for Greek Paleography.

Go to Top of Page


George

Greece
615 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2011 :  19:22:26  

 

You don't need specialists in Paleography - you need time, love and effort in order to study Greek as much as possible.

Go to Top of Page


Page: of 2 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Next Page
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
Jump To:

Promote Greek Learning

Use Elpenor's Libraries and Greek Language departments to stimulate your thinking. To refer to a text there published, just copy its url and paste it in your post. ||| Get updates of all Ellopos sites by e-mail. ||| Download Shortcuts for easy access to the Communities - or drag this icon and drop it in the Links bar of your browser :ELPENOR

Reference address : https://www.ellopos.net/elpenor/koinonia/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=561© Elpenor