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lorelei

Romania
4 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2007 :  12:09:26  


hello everyone!

i want to learn more about the way the presocratics refer to love: wich of the words is used (eros, philia or agape) and what meanings do they have? i need some advices about what books or articles or anything else should i read about this.


 

George

Greece
615 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2007 :  06:06:23  

 

You ask for a treatise, not a forum post! All three words are used for love, with eros being more intense. I suggest that you read the texts themselves and not articles, at least not before you read the texts.

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lorelei

Romania
4 Posts

Posted - 01 Mar 2007 :  02:17:27  

 

Thank you for your answer, but i am not making a research on the presocratic philosophy, i am just using this as a part of an introduction to a thesis about love in byzantine philosophy. This is why i need some information about the presocratic philosophers who had important theories about love and the way they used the three words, so i will read only their texts and have my conclusion. I asked about the words because i will read the texts in romanian and we have only two words for "love", wich are synonymes, so i will not be able to identify the greek word used in the texts.

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George

Greece
615 Posts

Posted - 01 Mar 2007 :  05:55:05  

 

In my opinion, this way seems scholastic, especially if it is about an introductory section to your main thesis. And what is the gain? In byzantine theology eros is more intense than agape and philia, just like in ancient Greece. Recall Symeon's Hymns of Divine Love (eroton). The dominant word is eros - which in modern times tends to signify rather a sexual relationship. Besides this, how are you going to judge my or anyone's opinion on that matter, since you don't know Greek? It would be more safe to work reversely; instead of starting from the words, to start from the meanings. You can locate meanings of love in various texts, no matter the Greek words used, because the same word (e.g. eros) has different meanings from time to time even in the same author.

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lorelei

Romania
4 Posts

Posted - 01 Mar 2007 :  10:09:25  

 

In this introduction i was supposed to take each of the three words and say something about their meanings in ancient philosophy, in byzantine philosophy, and something about the way they are used now by some philosophers and theologicians. I believe this ts the easier way because there are many meanings and only three words. Anyway, for me it was enough to write about the meanings of "love", insisting on those meanings which are mostly used in byzantine philosophy and explaining the way i am using this word in my thesis. But i am trying to follow my teacher's advice...
I have searched the presocratic philosophy and found something about love as some kind of universal force bringigng things together. I am interested in love as personal relation, and i am not sure i can find this in presocratic philosophy...

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George

Greece
615 Posts

Posted - 01 Mar 2007 :  13:24:09  

 

For love as a personal relation in Presocratics you must study mainly Homer and Lyric poets (Sappho, Archilochus, etc)

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